Film

Tampopo at the Cinematheque

I told myself that my two teachers, both middle-aged Chinese gentlemen, were the last people I'd take to see Tampopo. I told my brother as much, and he agreed. Yet as it turned out, both my teachers accompanied me to the Cinematheque late this January to watch the new digital restoration of Tampopo on the big screen.

Author: 
Chris Spangenberg
  • Posted on: 20 March 2017
  • By: Arts and Entert...
VIFF: Hello Destroyer

A popular topic amongst many of the films at VIFF this year is mental health. Whether characters are learning to live with the complications of specific diagnoses or coming to grips with the realities of mental health in general, filmmakers are creating substantial narratives that represent the complexities of being human. Kevin Funk’s tense pseudo-thriller Hello Destroyer, is a prime example of an authentic and powerful portrayal of the impacts of one’s social environment on mental health.

Author: 
Jamie Cessford
  • Posted on: 14 November 2016
  • By: CJSF Station Manager
Victoria

Victoria is many things: high-octane heist-thriller, transnational drama, triumphant experiment in technique, and a 'True Berliner' wunderkind. None of these qualities stood out to me when the credits flashed across the screen at its wind-down conclusion. None mattered at the end, save for the titular character and the fates of the Berliner bunch themselves.

Author: 
Chris Spangenberg
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
Room

Room puts us into the mindset of five-year-old Jack, providing us a keyhole into his limited worldview as he leaves the room in which he's been trapped in all his life for the first time. What begins as an exciting premise on the exploration of the outside world through the alluring eyes of a child starts to lose its magic on us once the film dwells in melodrama, shifting its focus from thought-provokingly nuanced moments towards those driveling with superfluous sentiment.

Author: 
Thanh Nguyen
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
Fractured Land

Fractured Land follows a young Caleb Behn, a First Nations leader in the making, who is deeply disturbed by the environmental destruction caused by the oil and gas industry in the land he calls home.

Author: 
Nathalie Lopez
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon

Nowadays, National Lampoon is a brand that has for the most part faded from popular culture. You might remember National Lampoon as part of the title of late 70's and 80's classic comedies like National Lampoon's Animal House or National Lampoon's Family Vacation films (those family road trip movies with Chevy Chase in them). But the name started as a satire magazine (like MAD Magazine for adults) and in its heyday, it was the epicenter of the hottest talent in the American comedy scene.

Author: 
Scott Wood
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
Amy

A true artist’s expression is not merely their motif, but their sanctuary. It’s the only way to co-exist with their demons. They do not seek fame; rather they have an intrinsic need to express their pain and suffering. Moreover, fame often compromises and puts restrictions on how they express themselves through art. They are coerced to project an image that sells. Gradually they succumb to the pressure of record label’s corporate mission statements and the constant hounding by the media. Amy Whinehouse had a very devoted, pure and sincere relationship to her music.

Author: 
Nick Pannu
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
VIFF: The Chaperone and 1987

September 30th was Canadian triumph, with screening of two Canadian films written and directed by creative Quebecers. The screening I attended opened with the Canadian short film, The Chaperone by Fraser Munden and Neil Rathbone and was followed by Ricardo Trogi’s 1987.

The short, The Chaperone, is about an African-American schoolteacher fighting off a drugged-up motorcycle gang in '80s Francophone Canada after they invaded the student dance he was chaperoning.

Author: 
Denise Mok
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
VIFF: Mommy

Seemingly with a vendetta to be the most heart-wrenching film you’ve ever seen, Xavier Dolan’s fifth feature film Mommy (2014) plays out like the most twisted Freudian melodrama, whilst still maintaining a tone of sincerity, hope, and sweet nostalgia.

Author: 
Jesse Gotfrit
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator
VIFF: Regarding Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag was an American writer known for many works, including On Photography, Illness as a Metaphor, and The Way We Live Now. I had heard of Susan Sontag and read snippets of her work prior to attending Regarding Susan Sontag on September 30th, which is being shown as part of VIFF. From what little familiarity I had, my interest in Susan was initially tied to her relationship with photographer Annie Lebowitz, an iconic American portrait photographer.

Author: 
Maggie Poirier
  • Posted on: 11 March 2016
  • By: Administrator

Pages